© 2016-2019. Collaton Consultancy Limited, 8 Grampian Close, Collaton St Mary, Paignton Devon, TQ4 7GD, UK

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Spa Pools and HSG 282 (2017)

Knowledge

Précis of HSG 282 relating to Spa Pools

HSG 282 is primarily for those who manage or operate spa-pool systems and explains how to manage and control the risks from Legionella and other infectious agents. It will also help service suppliers, designers, manufacturers, importers, suppliers and installers of spa-pool systems meet their legal responsibilities. As well as guidance on operating and maintaining commercial-type systems, there is specific advice on domestic-type spa pools or hot tubs used as part of a business activity, for example in holiday park rental units, hotel bedrooms with a dedicated spa and systems on display or at exhibitions. Water in spa pools should be free from irritant substances, chemicals and infectious microbiological agents at levels which may be harmful to health. Microbiological hazards are generally introduced from bathers or external sources, ie the source water, atmosphere, and surface surrounds. The risk of microbial growth increases with the introduction of nutrients (for example mucus, saliva, perspiration, dead skin, suntan lotion, spray tans, cosmetics, shampoo and soap residues, urine and faecal matter, and hair). Poorly designed or poorly managed spa-pool systems can provide the conditions to create the risk of acquiring an infectious disease. Micro-organisms found in a spa pool include Legionella, Coliforms, e-Coli, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Mycobacterium avium and Mycobacterium species, Staphylococcus aureus and Molluscum contagiosum all of which can cause serious illnesses in humans. Other hazards include issues related to chemicals, temperature, contact with electricity, slips trips and falls, confined spaces, manual handling and entrapment. Designers, manufacturers, importers, suppliers (including hirers) and installers must ensure the spa pool is designed, constructed, tested, installed and commissioned so that it will be safe and any risks to health are controlled when it’s used. They must also provide adequate information for the user about the risks of the product. Common terms associated with spa pools are hot spa, hot tub, whirlpool spa and portable spa. Jacuzzi® is the registered trade name of a specific manufacturer and should not be mistaken for a generic name for spa pools. There are other installations such as: compact spa-pool installations that have been designed often with air induction and a counter-current exercise unit; joined swimming pool and spa pool compartments to enable swimming in a confined area; or larger volume spa-pool installations with air induction, often in conjunction with a variety of water features. Where domestic-type spa pools are used as a business activity, the bather load is restricted to a discrete group of users. Where a hot tub or spa pool is used as a business activity, the total water volume should be replaced each week, or after each group of users, if earlier. For more details on HSG 282 and operating spa pools download our précis by clicking here.

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Knowledge

© 2016-2019 Collaton Consultancy Limited, 8 Grampian Close,

Collaton St Mary, Paignton Devon, TQ4 7GD, United Kingdom. UK

Company Registration number 9930189

Site Map

Spa Pools and HSG 282 (2017)

Knowledge

Précis of HSG 282 relating to Spa Pools

HSG 282 is primarily for those who manage or operate spa-pool systems and explains how to manage and control the risks from Legionella and other infectious agents. It will also help service suppliers, designers, manufacturers, importers, suppliers and installers of spa-pool systems meet their legal responsibilities. As well as guidance on operating and maintaining commercial- type systems, there is specific advice on domestic-type spa pools or hot tubs used as part of a business activity, for example in holiday park rental units, hotel bedrooms with a dedicated spa and systems on display or at exhibitions. Water in spa pools should be free from irritant substances, chemicals and infectious microbiological agents at levels which may be harmful to health. Microbiological hazards are generally introduced from bathers or external sources, ie the source water, atmosphere, and surface surrounds. The risk of microbial growth increases with the introduction of nutrients (for example mucus, saliva, perspiration, dead skin, suntan lotion, spray tans, cosmetics, shampoo and soap residues, urine and faecal matter, and hair). Poorly designed or poorly managed spa-pool systems can provide the conditions to create the risk of acquiring an infectious disease. Micro-organisms found in a spa pool include Legionella, Coliforms, e-Coli, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Mycobacterium avium and Mycobacterium species, Staphylococcus aureus and Molluscum contagiosum all of which can cause serious illnesses in humans. Other hazards include issues related to chemicals, temperature, contact with electricity, slips trips and falls, confined spaces, manual handling and entrapment. Designers, manufacturers, importers, suppliers (including hirers) and installers must ensure the spa pool is designed, constructed, tested, installed and commissioned so that it will be safe and any risks to health are controlled when it’s used. They must also provide adequate information for the user about the risks of the product. Common terms associated with spa pools are hot spa, hot tub, whirlpool spa and portable spa. Jacuzzi® is the registered trade name of a specific manufacturer and should not be mistaken for a generic name for spa pools. There are other installations such as: compact spa-pool installations that have been designed often with air induction and a counter-current exercise unit; joined swimming pool and spa pool compartments to enable swimming in a confined area; or larger volume spa-pool installations with air induction, often in conjunction with a variety of water features. Where domestic-type spa pools are used as a business activity, the bather load is restricted to a discrete group of users. Where a hot tub or spa pool is used as a business activity, the total water volume should be replaced each week, or after each group of users, if earlier. For more details on HSG 282 and operating spa pools download our précis by clicking here.

Consultancy that helps

Knowledge

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